Sunday, 19 February 2012

DOTERRA Essential Oil Treatment for Uterine Fibroid

Uterine fibroid





Uterine fibroids are noncancerous growths of the uterus that often appear during your childbearing years. Also called fibromyomas, leiomyomas or myomas, uterine fibroids aren't associated with an increased risk of uterine cancer and almost never develop into cancer. As many as 3 out of 4 women have uterine fibroid sometime during their lives, but most are unaware of them because they often cause no symptoms. 
Uterine fibroids develop from the smooth muscular tissue of the uterus (myometrium). A single cell reproduces repeatedly, eventually creating a pale, firm, rubbery mass distinct from neighboring tissue. The growth patterns of uterine fibroids vary — some fibroids may continue to grow slowly; other fibroids may remain the same size or even shrink on their own over time.



In women who have symptoms, the most common symptoms of uterine fibroids include:
  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Prolonged menstrual periods — seven days or more of menstrual bleeding
  • Pelvic pressure or pain
  • Frequent urination
  • Difficulty emptying your bladder
  • Constipation
  • Backache or leg pains
Rarely, a fibroid can cause acute pain when it outgrows its blood supply. Deprived of nutrients, the fibroid begins to die. Byproducts from a degenerating fibroid can seep into surrounding tissue, causing pain and fever. A fibroid that hangs by a stalk inside or outside the uterus (pedunculated fibroid) can trigger pain by twisting on its stalk and cutting off its blood supply.
Fibroid location influences your signs and symptoms:
  • Submucosal fibroids. Fibroids that grow into the inner cavity of the uterus (submucosal fibroids) are thought to be primarily responsible for prolonged, heavy menstrual bleeding and are a problem for women attempting pregnancy.
  • Subserosal fibroids. Fibroids that project to the outside of the uterus (subserosal fibroids) can sometimes press on your bladder, causing you to experience urinary symptoms. If fibroids bulge from the back of your uterus, they occasionally can press either on your rectum, causing constipation, or on your spinal nerves, causing backache.
Fibroids range in size from seedlings, undetectable by the human eye, to bulky masses that can distort and enlarge the uterus. They can be single or multiple, in extreme cases expanding the uterus so much that it reaches the rib cage.
Research and clinical experience point to these factors as the cause of Uterine Fibroid:
  • Genetic alterations. Many fibroids contain alterations in genes that are different from those in normal uterine muscle cells.
  • Hormones. Estrogen and progesterone, two hormones that stimulate development of the uterine lining during each menstrual cycle in preparation for pregnancy, appear to promote the growth of fibroids. Fibroids contain more estrogen and progesterone receptors than do normal uterine muscle cells.
  • Other chemicals. Substances that help the body maintain tissues, such as insulin-like growth factor, may affect fibroid growth.

There are few known risk factors for uterine fibroids, other than being a woman of reproductive age. Other factors that can have an impact on fibroid development include:
  • Heredity. If your mother or sister had fibroids, you're at increased risk of also developing them.
  • Race. Black women are more likely to have fibroids than are women of other racial groups. In addition, black women have fibroids at younger ages, and they're also likely to have more or larger fibroids.
  • Pregnancy and childbirth. Pregnancy and childbirth seem to have a protective effect and may decrease your risk of developing uterine fibroids.
Areas of research
Research examining other potential factors in the development of fibroids continues in these areas:
  • Obesity. Some studies have suggested that obese women are at higher risk of fibroids, but other studies have not shown a link.
  • Oral contraceptives. So far, strong data exist showing that women who take oral contraceptives have a lower risk of fibroids. This is generally true for all women, except those who start oral contraceptives between ages 13 and 16. Some evidence also shows that progestin-only contraceptives may decrease risk.
DoTerra Essential Oil Treatment

PAIN: Deep Blue, AromaTouch and other specific oils applied topically to specific points of discomfort.  Also using the AromaTouch Technique on a frequent and consistent basis.

CLEANSING: Both liver and Candida Cleanse are mentioned.  Most commonly mentioned is the Candida Cleanse attributed to Dr. Hill that includes the following blend:
·   5 drops of lemon
·   5 drops of melaluca
·   3 drops on oregano
Put the oils into a gel cap and take internally twice a day for 10-14 days, rest two weeks and repeat the procedure.


Frankincense should also be considered for disorders of the uterus such as fibroid cysts, etc.  Use it to reduce existing abnormalities or consider it to prevent their formation.  Frankincense will also balance the endocrine system.  Use it by placing 2 or 3 drops under the tongue every night and every morning.
Dr. Hill suggest there is a connection between uterine fibroids and candida and suggest the candida cleanse using GX Assist  and PB Assist.



Contact us for any specific question at
theancientnaturaloils@gmail.com

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